How to Make Marshmallow, Part 2 Recipe

Moulds

With regard to moulds there are two options. The first is the easiest but can result in fairly unimaginative marshmallows. It involves simply pouring the beaten marshmallow mixture into a tray which has been lightly covered with butter/margarine and lightly dusted with a cornstarch/powdered sugar mixture. The dimensions of the tray relate to the amount of mixture and the final size of the marshmallow pieces desired. When the marshmallow mixture has set, it is turned out of the tray and cut into cubes using a blade or scissors. The pieces are then dusted with a cornstarch/powdered sugar mixture.

The other type of mould is known as a starch mould. Basically the mould is formed by preparing a tray of cornstarch – not packing it too tightly. Impressions are then made in the starch using shapes. Commonly the moulds are made from wood and more adventurous marshmallow producers have even made animal shaped moulds. The mixture is boiled and poured into the impressions in the starch. Once the technique is perfected many interesting marshmallow shapes can be made. Using starch moulding the marshmallow pieces set much more quickly and also the starch has a drying effect which prolongs the shelf-life.

Essences and colors

These ingredients are used to give the marshmallows a satisfactory appearance and taste. They are available in powdered or liquid form. Powdered flavors/colors should be mixed with the gelatine prior to adding it to the very hot water. Liquid flavor/colors can be added during beating. It is most important to use food grade quality essences and colors and if these are not available in your local shops you could try at your local bakery if they are making various cakes and sweets. Otherwise it may necessitate a trip to your nearest large town or city.

The most commonly used essences are rose water and vanilla. However, you could experiment with any essence you wanted to.

Any food grade color could be experimented with according to local preferences and local regulations.

Other equipment

The other equipment required includes:

  • Electric or gas hotplate
  • Saucepans (preferably aluminum or stainless steel)
  • Measuring scales (0-100g and 0-1kg)
  • Wooden spoons

Recipe A1:

  • Sugar (600g)
  • Glucose (400g)
  • Water (250ml)
  • Heat to 116°C
  • Addition of 1 tablespoon lemon juice if not using citric acid
  • Beat for 10-15 minutes (if using liquid color/flavor add now)
  • Pour into prepared moulds
  • Leave to set ½-1 hour
  • Dust pieces with icing sugar/cornflour mixture
  • Pack

Recipe A2:

  • Sugar (600g)
  • Glucose (400g)
  • Water (250ml)
  • Heat to 116°C
  • Addition of 1 tablespoon lemon juice if not using citric acid
  • Beat for 10-15 minutes (if using liquid color/flavor add now)
  • Pour into prepared moulds
  • Leave to set ½-1 hour
  • Dust pieces with icing sugar/cornflour mixture
  • Pack

Recipe B:

  • Sugar – 1000g
  • Cream of tartar – 10g
  • Water – 500ml (250ml for Gelatine, 250ml (minimum) for sugar)
  • Gelatine – 50g
  • Citric acid (or lemon juice) – 5g
  • Colorings/flavorings – The minimum

Notes on method

Using the following ingredients follow the same procedure as for recipe A. Recipe B is significantly cheaper than recipe A but can have a shorter shelf life.

Dissolve the gelatine by adding it to very hot water and transfer to mixing bowl. Boil the sugar and glucose, with at least 250ml of water, to 116°C. The quantity of water is not critical provided that the minimum has been added. More water will result in a longer time to reach 116°C. Using more water is useful for the cream of tartar recipe because the longer heating time will cause more inversion of the sugar. Pour this slowly in a thin stream into the gelatine solution beating all the time. Continue to beat until the maximum volume is attained (approximately 5-10 minutes).

If using the starch moulding technique transfer the bowl containing the mixture to a boiling water bath and heat sufficiently to allow the batch to be poured into the starch mould. A large icing bag is very useful. Allow pieces to set. Pack in polypropylene. Polythene is okay but the shelf-life is shorter.

If using the oiled and floured tray technique the additional heating method using a water bath may not be necessary. Therefore, pour mixture in the prepared tray. When set, process as in the flow diagram.

As can be seen from these two recipes there is no blueprint recipe for making very good quality marshmallows. Different climates, different equipment and different qualities of raw materials in different countries around the world are reasons for this. Hence, it is emphasized that although the above recipes will produce acceptable marshmallows, the small business person or group should continually strive to improve their products. Although an element of this will come through increased familiarization with the ingredients and process over-time, making deliberate small changes to the recipe and recording these changes and the quality of the final product will result in positive steps towards the development of a product with optimum quality characteristics.

* A note on invert sugar

The normal sugar which you can buy in the shops has the chemical name of sucrose and is composed of two different sugars: one unit of glucose joined to one unit of fructose. The inversion of sugar is the chemical breaking of the link between the glucose and fructose units which results in a mixture of: sucrose units, glucose units and fructose units. This mixture is known as invert sugar. (Complete inversion to glucose and fructose has special applications in the food industry.)

In certain food processing activities this inversion process is very important. For example in the case of marshmallow the inversion process is necessary to increase the storage life of the jam by minimizing the chance of the sucrose going back to its crystalline form which is unsatisfactory for good quality marshmallows.

source: practicalaction.org, margomilne.com

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