A New Way of Farming Crab

The new technique involves little capital and helps protect the country’s remaining mangroves.

In Barangay Manalo and Tagbaros here in Puerto Princesa, aquasilviculture has been introduced. Aquasilviculture is the integration of aquaculture (mudcrab culture in this case) and mangrove forestry (otherwise known as silviculture). While it is new in the Philippines, aquasilviculture has been practiced in Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam and China.

In farming the alimango, a portion of the mangrove are is fenced off, and mudcrab are stocked. A portion of the botton is excavated so mudcrab can seek shelter during low tide. The mangrove stands are not cleared.

The advantage of this new method include low investment cost, ease of construction, protection of mangroves, and the use of locally available materials.

Between 5,000 and 10,000 mudcrab juveniles weighing 30 to 40 grams per piece measuring 5-10 cm. carapace length can be stocked per hectare.

After 3 months, yield of 600 kilos per hectare can be achieve with survival rate of 65-70%.

A fishfarmer or community cooperative can get a 44% return-on-investment (ROI) with payback period of 2.27 years. Initial investment is around P 200,000 for one hectare farm.

The culture of alimango in mangrove areas is being tried by the local government units of Bgy. Manalo and Tagbaros in conjunction with a consortium composed of SEAFDEC Aquaculture Dept.

Note: Original article were sourced from www.seafdec.org.ph, re-posted on this site with permission.

For more information:

Sotheast Asian Fisheries Development Center

Main Office:
Tigbauan, Iloilo 5021
Republic of the Philippines
Phone: +63 33 511 9171, +63 33 336 2965
Fax: +63 33 335 1008,+63 33 511 8709,+63 33 511 9070
Web: www.seafdec.org

Manila Office:
17 Times Street, West Triangle, 1104 Quezon City,
Republic of the Philippines
Tel +63 2372 3980 to 82
Fax +63 2372 3983
Email: [email protected]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *